The majority of US chief executives do not receive independent leadership advice even though they would like to.

This is according to a new survey of senior business figures carried out by the Graduate School of Business at Stanford University and the Miles Group. 

Some two-thirds of CEOs said they have not received any instruction from external advisors, while the same is true for nearly half of senior executives. However, close to 100 per cent claimed they enjoy the process of being coached.

Professor David Larcker, who led the study, commented: "Given how vitally important it is for the CEO to be getting the best possible counsel … it’s concerning that so many of them are going it alone."

Of those CEOs who have received coaching, 78 per cent said it was their own idea. 

Miles Group chief executive Stephen Miles claimed this is encouraging as it shows business leaders are aware they do not have all the answers and can benefit from guidance.

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