The majority of US chief executives do not receive independent leadership advice even though they would like to.

This is according to a new survey of senior business figures carried out by the Graduate School of Business at Stanford University and the Miles Group. 

Some two-thirds of CEOs said they have not received any instruction from external advisors, while the same is true for nearly half of senior executives. However, close to 100 per cent claimed they enjoy the process of being coached.

Professor David Larcker, who led the study, commented: "Given how vitally important it is for the CEO to be getting the best possible counsel … it’s concerning that so many of them are going it alone."

Of those CEOs who have received coaching, 78 per cent said it was their own idea. 

Miles Group chief executive Stephen Miles claimed this is encouraging as it shows business leaders are aware they do not have all the answers and can benefit from guidance.

Insights

Insight

Is mindset fast becoming more important than skill-set?

Getting management teams and workforces to embrace change fast enough has emerged as a universal...

Insight

Understanding how to seize the mindset opportunity

Faced with a world where potentially half of their management team and workforce can’t cope with...

Insight

What every healthcare leader should be asking about AI

If AI is to fully realise its considerable potential, how will we overcome the ethical problems w...